R

Temperature of European rivers and future climate in 50 lines of R code

During the last summer the water temperature in some important rivers (especially the Rhine and the Rhone) in central Europe was so high that some nuclear and coal power plants in Germany, France and Switzerland had to limit their generation or even shut down due to the regulations imposing them to do not discharge the warm water used for cooling the plant when the river temperature was too high. It was July, during a heatwave strong enough to deserve a Wikipedia page.

Consecutive days of good weather in the Netherlands

I have recently moved in North Holland and in the past weeks the weather was particularly fortunate: for many (consecutive) days there was no rain and the temperature have been very high for this area (the maximum temperature was easily above 25° degrees). Given that I have no experience yet for this weather, I asked around how frequently this happens and I got diverse answers. Then, I have decided to look at some historical time-series of temperature and precipitation to try to satisfy my curiosity.

Tidyverse and NetCDFs: a first exploration

I am not exaggerating when I say that the main reason to develop in R is the presence of the tidyverse and the plethora of packages that let you to explore data and deal easily with the most common tasks (splitting, grouping, temporal aggregation, etc.). Unfortunately, the biggest limitation in R is its capability to manipulate effectively arrays of data (data cubes), especially nowadays when it is normal to deal with very large data sets (please, don’t say “big”).